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Biology, Fun & Misc

Tumblr with geeky stuff, science and many other cool things.
Sep 30 '14
Sep 29 '14

(Source: scajaquada)

Sep 29 '14
Sep 29 '14
zolloc:

re:2 

zolloc:

re:2 

Sep 29 '14

vv0lf:

chezphoto:

this week’s hair color is brought to you by sunsets after a week of rain in june

Wow what this is amazing

Sep 29 '14

(Source: monpetitfantome)

Sep 29 '14

queenofvanillasparkles:

brokethespacebar:

If there is one thing in my life I regret, it’s not this.

YES

Sep 29 '14

mydarkenedeyes:

Nikita Gill - A Quiet Day In Wonderland (2014)

Sep 29 '14
medicalschool:

Histology of the Ovary - antral follicle

medicalschool:

Histology of the Ovary - antral follicle

(Source: php.med.unsw.edu.au)

Sep 29 '14
science-junkie:

How plankton gets jet lagged
A hormone that governs sleep and jet lag in humans may also drive the mass migration of plankton in the ocean, scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany, have found. The molecule in question, melatonin, is essential to maintain our daily rhythm, and the European scientists have now discovered that it governs the nightly migration of a plankton species from the surface to deeper waters. The findings, published online today in Cell, indicate that melatonin’s role in controlling daily rhythms probably evolved early in the history of animals, and hold hints to how our sleep patterns may have evolved.[…]
[The researchers] discovered a group of specialised motor neurons that respond to melatonin. Using modern molecular sensors, [they were] able to visualise the activity of these neurons in the larva’s brain, and found that it changes radically from day to night. The night-time production of melatonin drives changes in these neurons’ activity, which in turn cause the larva’s cilia to take long pauses from beating. Thanks to these extended pauses, the larva slowly sinks down. During the day, no melatonin is produced, the cilia pause less, and the larva swims upwards.
“Step by step we can elucidate the evolutionary origin of key functions of our brain. The fascinating picture emerges that human biology finds its roots in some deeply conserved, fundamental aspects of ocean ecology that dominated life on Earth since ancient evolutionary times”
Read more @EMBL

science-junkie:

How plankton gets jet lagged

A hormone that governs sleep and jet lag in humans may also drive the mass migration of plankton in the ocean, scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany, have found. The molecule in question, melatonin, is essential to maintain our daily rhythm, and the European scientists have now discovered that it governs the nightly migration of a plankton species from the surface to deeper waters. The findings, published online today in Cell, indicate that melatonin’s role in controlling daily rhythms probably evolved early in the history of animals, and hold hints to how our sleep patterns may have evolved.[…]

[The researchers] discovered a group of specialised motor neurons that respond to melatonin. Using modern molecular sensors, [they were] able to visualise the activity of these neurons in the larva’s brain, and found that it changes radically from day to night. The night-time production of melatonin drives changes in these neurons’ activity, which in turn cause the larva’s cilia to take long pauses from beating. Thanks to these extended pauses, the larva slowly sinks down. During the day, no melatonin is produced, the cilia pause less, and the larva swims upwards.

Step by step we can elucidate the evolutionary origin of key functions of our brain. The fascinating picture emerges that human biology finds its roots in some deeply conserved, fundamental aspects of ocean ecology that dominated life on Earth since ancient evolutionary times

Read more @EMBL

Sep 29 '14
Sep 29 '14
Sep 29 '14
"I’m an adult, but not like a real adult"
anyone between the ages of 18 and 25  (via forebidden)

(Source: prettyboystyles)

Sep 29 '14
Sep 29 '14
carlsagan:

unclepolymer:

Pusheen the cat making some chemistry.

That cat is not wearing safety goggles, he hasn’t even bothered to clean up that spilled solvent, and he is holding that Erlenmeyer flask way too close to his face.
Pusheen the Cat, more like Pusheen the limits of lab safety

carlsagan:

unclepolymer:

Pusheen the cat making some chemistry.

That cat is not wearing safety goggles, he hasn’t even bothered to clean up that spilled solvent, and he is holding that Erlenmeyer flask way too close to his face.

Pusheen the Cat, more like Pusheen the limits of lab safety