Install Theme

Your web-browser is very outdated, and as such, this website may not display properly. Please consider upgrading to a modern, faster and more secure browser. Click here to do so.

Biology, Fun & Misc

Tumblr with geeky stuff, science and many other cool things.
Jul 23 '14

the-full-grohac:

iguanamouth:

youre gonna look so goddamn cool

Good morning.

Jul 23 '14
ilovecharts:

The World Cup
via Kurt White

ilovecharts:

The World Cup

via Kurt White

Jul 22 '14

violentadd:

Sometimes I get the weird urge to paint

Jul 22 '14

(Source: pyonkotchi)

Jul 21 '14
Jul 21 '14

(Source: srsmitty)

Jul 21 '14
owlsstuff:

More irresistible owls here: http://ift.tt/JQ5da3 Photo source (http://ift.tt/1zWJTFn)

owlsstuff:

More irresistible owls here: http://ift.tt/JQ5da3 Photo source (http://ift.tt/1zWJTFn)

Jul 21 '14
beesandbombs:

rainbow spinners

beesandbombs:

rainbow spinners

Jul 21 '14

(Source: urbanoutfitters)

Jul 21 '14
kqedscience:

How Colors Smell"When someone asks me what flavor slushie I want, I don’t say “cherry,” I say “red.” That flavor is called “red.” “Blue” is another flavor a slushie might have. Similarly, a cherry smell—especially the chemically cherry smell of a red slushie—is a red smell.That one’s easy, since cherries are red. It doesn’t take a wild leap to make that association. But what color is the smell of, say, soap?A new study published in PLOS One finds that some people say white, some say yellow, some say blue. A group of international researchers had people from different cultures smell 14 scents and choose from 36 colors the one that they associated most with the odor.”
Find out more from theatlantic.

kqedscience:

How Colors Smell

"When someone asks me what flavor slushie I want, I don’t say “cherry,” I say “red.” That flavor is called “red.” “Blue” is another flavor a slushie might have. Similarly, a cherry smell—especially the chemically cherry smell of a red slushie—is a red smell.

That one’s easy, since cherries are red. It doesn’t take a wild leap to make that association. But what color is the smell of, say, soap?

A new study published in PLOS One finds that some people say white, some say yellow, some say blue. A group of international researchers had people from different cultures smell 14 scents and choose from 36 colors the one that they associated most with the odor.”

Find out more from theatlantic.

Jul 21 '14
hkirkh:

a happy caterpillar

hkirkh:

a happy caterpillar

Jul 21 '14

(Source: rock-1996)

Jul 21 '14
4 notes (via uooooo)
Jul 21 '14
Jul 21 '14

amolecularmatter:

The Incredible Eye

The eye stands as a testament to the effectiveness and magnitude of what can be achieved through natural selection. These extraordinary false-colour SEM images of the human eye were the brainchild of Professor Pietro Motta at the Institute of Human Anatomy of the University La Sapienza in Rome.

Top Left: Surface cells on the iris of the eye. Pigment cells (melanocytes, blue and brown) can be seen here, joined loosely together by connective tissue fibres (white). Smaller macrophage cells dot the surface.

Top Right: Lens of the eye. Lens cells run diagonally (dark green) across this field of view. The transparency of the lens (width 4 millimetres) is due to the absence of nuclei in these cells, and to the crystalline precision of their arrangement.

Centre: The inner surfaces of the iris and adjoining structures in the human eye. At far right (blue) is the edge of the pupil, the hole that allows light into the eye. Coloured mauve is the iris which controls the size of the pupil and therefore how much light will enter. The band of folds down the centre (red) are the ciliary processes.

Bottom left: The surface of the cornea. The matrix- like pattern (seen here) consists of individual flattened transparent cells. This is a stratified squamous epithelium which is 5 cell layers deep. Although full of nerves, there are no blood vessels in the cornea.

Bottom right: The human retina featuring the central fovea, a crater-like depression in the photosensitive layer of the eye. The foveal retina is the area of greatest visual acuity and contains only cone receptor cells. When an eye looks at an object, that part focused on the fovea is the portion most accurately registered by the brain.

All image credit goes to Professor Pietro Motta and Science Photo Library.