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Biology, Fun & Misc

Tumblr with geeky stuff, science and many other cool things.
Jul 28 '14
fenrirswolf:

#thx Nef#source

fenrirswolf:

#thx Nef

#source

Jul 28 '14
theeconomist:

Remembrance: A chart of the first world war’s casualties on the centenary of the outbreak

theeconomist:

Remembrance: A chart of the first world war’s casualties on the centenary of the outbreak

Jul 28 '14
ucsdhealthsciences:

Liver Scarring Mechanism Identified In Mice
The human liver may be our most undervalued organ.
Not only does it have lizard-like regenerative powers, its eight connected lobes work round the clock to detoxify us of our vices – be they a slab of fatty steak or a flagon of beer.
When we aren’t being bad, and even when we are, the liver also helps us digest our food, store energy and vitamins (it can hold several years’ worth of B-12), and clear our blood of residues from taking medications. It even plays a role in maintaining our hormonal balance and keeping our bones strong.
It does all of this if that meaty three-pound organ under the right side of our ribcage is working properly. If the liver becomes diseased, many vital bodily processes can go awry.
Regardless of the type of assault or insult, the liver almost always shows signs of abuse by forming fibrous scar tissue, which can further impair the liver’s ability to function, with profound health consequences.
Reporting in the current issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have described a fundamental mechanism underlying the progression of cholestatic liver fibrosis, which is caused by the impairment of bile formation or bile flow not by lifestyle choices, like heavy drinking.
“Our study puts into perspective many previously contradictory studies, and provides a general approach to understanding the distinct mechanisms which lead to liver scaring and fibrosis,” said senior author Tatiana Kisseleva, MD, PhD and an assistant professor in the Department of Surgery. Fibrosis refers to progressive liver scarring, occurring in most types of chronic liver disease.
In the study, researchers identified a type of cell in the livers of mice (portal fibroblasts) that respond to bile-related liver injuries. When these cells become activated and proliferate, they secrete fibrous scar tissue.
Though the study was conducted in mice, preventing the activation of these cells in human livers could help prevent liver scarring in people with cholestatic liver disease.
Toward this effort, the scientists have now identified novel markers of activated portal fibroblasts that could be used to evaluate the source of liver injury in patients.

ucsdhealthsciences:

Liver Scarring Mechanism Identified In Mice

The human liver may be our most undervalued organ.

Not only does it have lizard-like regenerative powers, its eight connected lobes work round the clock to detoxify us of our vices – be they a slab of fatty steak or a flagon of beer.

When we aren’t being bad, and even when we are, the liver also helps us digest our food, store energy and vitamins (it can hold several years’ worth of B-12), and clear our blood of residues from taking medications. It even plays a role in maintaining our hormonal balance and keeping our bones strong.

It does all of this if that meaty three-pound organ under the right side of our ribcage is working properly. If the liver becomes diseased, many vital bodily processes can go awry.

Regardless of the type of assault or insult, the liver almost always shows signs of abuse by forming fibrous scar tissue, which can further impair the liver’s ability to function, with profound health consequences.

Reporting in the current issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have described a fundamental mechanism underlying the progression of cholestatic liver fibrosis, which is caused by the impairment of bile formation or bile flow not by lifestyle choices, like heavy drinking.

“Our study puts into perspective many previously contradictory studies, and provides a general approach to understanding the distinct mechanisms which lead to liver scaring and fibrosis,” said senior author Tatiana Kisseleva, MD, PhD and an assistant professor in the Department of Surgery. Fibrosis refers to progressive liver scarring, occurring in most types of chronic liver disease.

In the study, researchers identified a type of cell in the livers of mice (portal fibroblasts) that respond to bile-related liver injuries. When these cells become activated and proliferate, they secrete fibrous scar tissue.

Though the study was conducted in mice, preventing the activation of these cells in human livers could help prevent liver scarring in people with cholestatic liver disease.

Toward this effort, the scientists have now identified novel markers of activated portal fibroblasts that could be used to evaluate the source of liver injury in patients.

Jul 28 '14
Jul 28 '14
Jul 28 '14
s-c-i-guy:

Scientists pinpoint when harmless bacteria became flesh-eating monsters
Bacterial diseases cause millions of deaths every year. Most of these bacteria were benign at some point in their evolutionary past, and we don’t always understand what turned them into disease-causing pathogens. In a new study, researchers have tracked down when this switch happened in a flesh-eating bacteria. They think the knowledge might help predict future epidemics.
The flesh-eating culprit in question is called GAS, or Group A β-hemolytic streptococcus, a highly infective bacteria. Apart from causing flesh-eating disease, GAS is also responsible for a range of less harmful infections. It affects more than 600m people every year, and causes an estimated 500,000 deaths.
These bacteria appeared to have affected humans since the 1980s. Scientists think that GAS must have evolved from a less harmful streptococcus strain. The new study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, reconstructs that evolutionary history.
James Musser of the Methodist Hospital Research Institute and lead researcher of the study said, “This is the first time we have been able to pull back the curtain to reveal the mysterious processes that gives rise to a virulent pathogen.”
source

s-c-i-guy:

Scientists pinpoint when harmless bacteria became flesh-eating monsters

Bacterial diseases cause millions of deaths every year. Most of these bacteria were benign at some point in their evolutionary past, and we don’t always understand what turned them into disease-causing pathogens. In a new study, researchers have tracked down when this switch happened in a flesh-eating bacteria. They think the knowledge might help predict future epidemics.

The flesh-eating culprit in question is called GAS, or Group A β-hemolytic streptococcus, a highly infective bacteria. Apart from causing flesh-eating disease, GAS is also responsible for a range of less harmful infections. It affects more than 600m people every year, and causes an estimated 500,000 deaths.

These bacteria appeared to have affected humans since the 1980s. Scientists think that GAS must have evolved from a less harmful streptococcus strain. The new study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, reconstructs that evolutionary history.

James Musser of the Methodist Hospital Research Institute and lead researcher of the study said, “This is the first time we have been able to pull back the curtain to reveal the mysterious processes that gives rise to a virulent pathogen.”

source

Jul 28 '14

house-of-gnar:

astral-nexus:

"A book for jotting your ideas down while on LSD"

I doubt it would come out that neat.

Jul 28 '14

(Source: addelburgh)

Jul 27 '14
battime:

Rousettus aegyptiacus - Egyptian fruit bat
Photo by Joy VanBuhler

battime:

Rousettus aegyptiacus - Egyptian fruit bat

Photo by Joy VanBuhler

Jul 27 '14
"A man sees in the world what he carries in his heart."
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Faust (via alcools)

(Source: sisyphean-revolt)

Jul 27 '14
varsovio:

Lucky Bunny (by Leviathor)

varsovio:

Lucky Bunny (by Leviathor)

(Source: varsovio)

Jul 27 '14
owlsstuff:

More irresistible owls here: http://ift.tt/JQ5da3 Photo source (http://ift.tt/1nJNQaX)

owlsstuff:

More irresistible owls here: http://ift.tt/JQ5da3 Photo source (http://ift.tt/1nJNQaX)

Jul 27 '14
Jul 27 '14

curiosamathematica:

Some formulas are plainly beautiful, aren’t they?

(Source: likeaphysicist)

Jul 27 '14